Office Hours and Locations

                          

Click Here To Call:   562-861-1600

 

MAIN OFFICE:

PICO RIVERA OFFICE
8445 S. Rosemead Blvd. Pico Rivera, CA 90660

PHONE:  562-861-1600 Click To Call

FAX:       (562) 861-1717 

 

PICO RIVERA HOURS

Monday 3pm to 7pm

 Tuesday 9am to 1pm

Wednesday 3pm to 7pm

Thursday 9am to 1pm and 3pm to 7pm

Friday 9am to 1pm

 

 

EL MONTE OFFICE

1304 Santa Anita Ave. Suite A El Monte, CA 91733

PHONE:   626-452-0202 Click To Call
FAX:       (626) 452-0200  

 

EL MONTE HOURS

Monday 9am to 1pm

Tuesday 2pm to 6pm

Wednesday 9am to 1pm

Thursday Closed

Friday 2pm to 6pm

 

 

To Rinse or Not to Rinse Your Food—That Is the Question

Posted by on Jul 18, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

To Rinse or Not to Rinse Your Food—That Is the Question

With all of the recent concern over food-borne bacteria such as E. coli, many people are wondering what they can do to protect themselves and their families. In particular, they’re wondering whether washing their foods before preparing and eating them really does any good. Interestingly, the answer to this seemingly simple question is both “Yes” and “No” depending on the foods. As you may have seen in news reports recently, Drexel University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are strongly advising people not...

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Water Beds and Back Health: The Pros and Cons

Posted by on Jul 17, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Water Beds and Back Health: The Pros and Cons

Many people may be surprised to learn that water beds have been around since the early 1800s. Indeed, the “Hydrostatic Bed,” conceived by Scottish physician Neil Arnott, was designed to stop patients from developing bedsores. Even Mark Twain had something to say about the water bed. In a July 23, 1871 article in The New York Times, Twain wrote, “In the infirmary will be kept one or two water-beds (for invalids whose pains will not allow them to be on a less yielding substance) and half a dozen reclining invalid-chairs on...

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Going to the Hospital? Here’s How to Protect Your Health While You’re There

Posted by on Jul 16, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Going to the Hospital? Here’s How to Protect Your Health While You’re There

Going to a hospital can prove dangerous to your health. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, 225,000 deaths per year are iatrogenic (attributable to doctors or healthcare professionals). This makes “death by doctor” the third most-common cause of death in the United States, after heart disease and all forms of cancer. So how can you protect your health while in a hospital? The first step is to do everything you can to stay out of a hospital in the first place by staying healthy. Eat the right kinds of foods—mostly...

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What Is Immunotherapy and How Can It Help with Food Allergies?

Posted by on Jul 15, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

What Is Immunotherapy and How Can It Help with Food Allergies?

Food allergies affect over 15 million Americans, including 1 in every 13 children under the age of 18. The symptoms of these allergic reactions can range from minor (e.g., itching, swelling of the lips, intestinal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting) to major or even life-threatening (e.g., development of hives and rashes, tightening of the throat to the point of being unable to breathe, significant drops in blood pressure). Having such an allergy—or being the parent of a child with such an allergy—can impose unwelcome lifestyle limitations and...

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What Is a Hyperextension Injury?

Posted by on Jul 14, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

What Is a Hyperextension Injury?

Joints in the human body normally have a fixed range of motion that involves both flexion (for example, folding your arm to your shoulder to create a zero-degree angle at the elbow) and extension (extending your arm out straight to create a 180-degree angle at the elbow). The same type of range of motion exists for the knee, and wider ranges of motion exist for ball-and-socket joints such as the hip and the shoulder, which can pivot in more directions than just forward and backward. A hyperextension injuryoccurs when a joint is moved past its...

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Want More Brain Power? Then Get Your Exercise!

Posted by on Jul 11, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Want More Brain Power? Then Get Your Exercise!

If you’re interested in becoming smarter, you don’t really have to invest in the many vitamins, herbs, and “cognitive training” software programs and seminars you see advertised on TV or on the Internet. All you have to do is go for a long walk three times a week. That’s the message of a research study published recently in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin and Review and presented at the 2013 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston. The study is a review of research conducted...

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Understanding MyPlate: Making the Most of the USDA’s Latest Nutrition Guide

Posted by on Jul 10, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Understanding MyPlate: Making the Most of the USDA’s Latest Nutrition Guide

MyPlateis the name of the latest nutrition guide published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as part of its ongoing efforts to inform the American public about the essentials of a healthy diet. Its symbol depicts a traditional place setting, consisting of a plate and a glass divided into five food groups—fruits, grains, vegetables, protein, and dairy. The MyPlate formulation is the latest in over 110 years of nutrition guides from the USDA and is an attempt to find a way to present basic nutrition advice in a format that is easily...

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Fear or Phobia: What’s the Difference?

Posted by on Jul 9, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Fear or Phobia: What’s the Difference?

It’s normal to have fears. Fear is a useful emotion that keeps us from doing things that may be harmful or dangerous. Our species continues to exist today because our earlier ancestors had a healthy fear of certain types of predators, environments and situations. In the modern world, many of those primal fears have become much less relevant. Nevertheless, quite a few of us still have a lingering apprehension of spiders, snakes, darkness, heights or other things that we perceive to be dangerous. For most people, this instinctive fear is just...

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Concussions and Academic Performance: Introducing the BrainSTEPS Protocol

Posted by on Jul 8, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

Concussions and Academic Performance: Introducing the BrainSTEPS Protocol

A concussion can be either a mild injury or one with long-standing consequences. Sometimes the symptoms go away quickly, sometimes they return, and sometimes they linger for years or even get worse. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines a concussion as “a type of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works. Concussions can also occur from a blow to the body that causes the head to move rapidly back and forth. Even a ‘ding,’...

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What is Supination?

Posted by on Jul 7, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off

What is Supination?

The term “supination” refers to a position of the arm or foot that is different than the normal, at-rest position. This is the opposite of “pronation”. In most cases, supination refers to the foot because of the problems associated with foot supination. FreeDictionary.com offers a good working definition of the verb “supinate”. It means “to turn or rotate (the foot) by adduction and inversion so that the outer edge of the sole bears the body’s weight.” The opposite effect—pronation—is when the inside of the foot (the arch)...

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